CORONA VIRUS

GUIDE for REPATRIATION of DECEASED BODIES & HUMAN REMAINS

FAQ’s  (Fesili Masani o le Koviti19)

In December 31, 2019 a new flu-like illness, novel coronavirus, was detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province of China. Since this time, many countries and territories outside of China have reported laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths. See the following link for daily updated reports.

www.health.gov.ws

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports

Currently no cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Samoa, however it is important that individuals, especially international travellers, remain on alert for signs and symptoms of the virus and practice good hand and cough/respiratory hygiene to reduce the risk of potential infection.

O le siama/vairasi o le Korona e mafua mai i se auaiga o siama tetele o le Korona e mama’i ai meaola ma tagata soifua. E iai isi ituaiga o siama/vairasi o le Korona e a’afia ai tagata soifua i fa’ama’i e a’afia ai ala ea, e pei o le fulū ma isi fa’ama’i ogaoga e pei o fa’ama’i o le Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)i le 2003 ma le Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) i le 2013. O le fa’ama’i o le Korona-19 (COVID-19) o se fa’ama’i e mafua i siama/vairasi o le Korona ma o se fa’ama’i fou .

Ona o le Korona-19 o se vairasi, e le mafai ona togafitia e nei fualaau/vai tui.

E le o iai se tui puipui o lenei vairasi e mafai ai ona foia lenei fa’ama’i i le taimi nei.

E tusa ai ma fa’amaumauga o lo’o iai le taimi nei, o lenei siama/vairasi o le Korona-19 e mafai ona pipi’i ma ola i luga o meafaitino i ni itula, pe atoa foi ni aso. (E fua le ola a le siama i ituaiga mea faitino, o le ituaiga si’osi’omaga fa’apea ma le tau).

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans.  In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19.

Because COVID-19 is a virus, antibiotics will not work to treat or prevent it. To date, there is no vaccine and no specific antiviral medicine to prevent or treat COVID-19.

Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on the COVID-19 virus) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions (e.g. type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment).

O le Korona-19 o se fa’ama’i e fou, sa ola ma pipisi i totonu o Saina i le taulaga o Wuhan i le masina o Tesema 2019.

COVID-19 is the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. It is now a pandemic affecting many countries globally
  • Fiva, pepe le tino, tale, ma faigata ona mānava.
  • O isi tagata ua a’afia i lenei fa’ama’i e fa’asolo ina tiga ma matutu le fa’a’i, tafe le isu. E mafai fo’i ona manava tata. O nei auga e seasea ona maua ae alia’e lava i nisi o tagata.
  • O isi tagata ua a’afia i siama/vairasi ae le alaia’e ni auga po’o foliga vaaia ma o lo’o malolosi lava
O a’afiaga ogaoga, e mafai ona a’afia i le nimonia, tele le a’afiaga o ala manava, fa’aleagaina fatuga’o, ma fa’asolo ina maliliu ai.

  • The most common symtoms of COVID-19 are fever, dry cough and  tiredness
  • Other symptoms that are less common and may affect some patients include aches and pain, nasal congestion, headache, conjunctivitis, sore throat, diarrhea, loss of taste or smell or a rash on skin or discoloration of fingers or toes. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but only have very mild symptoms
  • Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing hospital treatment.
  • Around 1 out of every 5 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing.
  • Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart and lung problems, diabetes, or cancer, are at higher risk of developing serious illness. 
  • However, anyone can catch COVID-19 and become seriously ill.  People of all ages who experience fever and/or  cough associated with difficulty breathing/shortness of breath, chest pain/pressure, or loss of speech or movement should seek medical attention immediately. If possible, it is recommended to call the health care provider or facility first, so the patient can be directed to the right clinic.
  • Video: Five things to know about COVID-19 transmission


  • E pipisi siama/vairasi o le Korona-19 mai le tagata ua a’afia i le tagata e le’i a’afia.
  • O fāua ma fatu tale e pipisi mai le gutu ma isu o le tagata ua a’afia i siama/vairasi o lenei fa’ama’i pe a tale, mafatua, ma manava.
  • O fāua ma fatu tale e pipisi mai le tagata ua a’afia ma pipi’i i luga o meafaitino e pei o lavalava, laulau, nofoa, ki o moli, au o faitoto’a ma isi. Afai e tagofia e lima o le tagata e le’i a’afia meafaitino o lo’o pipi’i ai siama/vairaisi o lenei fa’ama’i e mafai ona a’afia pe a pa’i lima i mata, gutu ma le isu, aemaise pe a le fufuluina lima o lē e le’i a’afia
  • E mafai foi ona pipisi i le tagata e manavaina i totonu faua ma fatutale pe pipisi mai gutu ma le isu o le tagata ua a’afia i le fa’ama’i o le Korona -19. Ia atoa le 1 mita e te va ai ma le isi tagata ua a’afia.
  • Ua fa’amaonia mai suesuega i le taimi nei, o le siama/vairasi o le Korona-19 e pipisi i faua ma fatu tale e pipisi mai le gutu ma le isu o le tagata ua a’afia.

O lo’o mata’ituina pea e le Fa’alapotopotoga o le Soifua Maloloina o le Lalolagi suesuega ma sailiiliga mo nisi auala e pipisi ai siama o lenei fa’ama’i ma fa’ailoa fa’alauaitele mo le silafia e tagata uma o auala e pipisi ai lenei fa’ama’i.

  • People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus.
  • The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales.
  • These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth.
  • People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. This is why it is important to stay more than 2 meter (6 feet) away from a person who is sick.

WHO is assessing ongoing research on the ways COVID-19 is spread and will continue to share updated findings.    

O fatu tale po’o faua o le tagata ua a’afia e mafai fo’i ona pipisi atu i le isi tagata pe a;

  • mafatua
  • fogi le isu,
  • feinu ma a’ai i le ipu e tasi
  • Pipi’i i vaega e taumamafa ai aemaise pe a le fufuluina
  • anuvale
  • E mafai ona a’afia le tagata e le’i a’afia pe a pa’i lima i faua, fatu tale ma isupe o le tagata ua a’afia o lo’o pipi’i i so’o se mea faitino (fa’ataita’iga – computer, laulau, nofoa, moega/aluga/ieafu o e o lo’o gasegase ma a’afia) ma fa’afuase’i ona tago i foliga (mata, isu ma le gutu)
  • E taua tele le taumamao ma le tagata ua a’afia i auga ma foliga o lenei fa’ama’i aemaise o tagata o lo’o maua i auga o leni fa’ama’i po’o fa’ama’i fulū.

Silasila i le taiala o le upegatafailagi mo nisi fa’amatalaga e uiga i auala e pipisi ai lenei fa’ama’i. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1APwq1df6Mw

Respiratory droplets are also found and expelled when;

  • sneezing,
  • blowing your nose,
  • in shared drinks,
  • on eating and drinking utensils,
  • uninfected persons can become infected when they inhale or touch their face - eyes, nose or mouth – and transfer respiratory droplets left on objects or surfaces* that an infected person has coughed, sneezed, blown their nose, exhaled/yawned or spat on.

             *(eg., computer keyboard, tables, sick       beddings)

  • It is, therefore, important to stay more than two meter/six feet (2 meter/6 feet) away from a person who is sick or has flu-like symptoms.

See the link below for a brief video on COVID-19”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1APwq1df6Mw

E fuafua le vave ma faigofie ona a’afia le tagata i lenei fa’ama’i pe afai e nofo latalata i se nofoaga po’o se atunu’u o lo’o toatele tagata o lo’o a’afia i le Korona-19. O le 95% o le faitau aofai o tagata ua a’afia i lenei fa’ama’i sa amata mai i le itumalo o Hubei i le atunu’u o Saina.

E maualalo lava se avanoa e a’afia ai isi atunu’u e pei o Samoa ma nisi atunu’u o le lalolagi e le’i a’afia. Ae taua le nofo malamalama i tulaga o lo’o iai le fa’ama’i ina ia mafai ona tapena mamao iai mo le o’o mai o lenei fa’ama’i.

E tele le avanoa e a’afia ai le tagata i lenei fa’ama’i pe a:

  • Tagata o lo’o maua i le fulu (maualuga tele)
  • Tagata e le o maua i auga o le fulu (e mafai ona a’afia ae maualalo le avanoa e a’afia ai)
  • Tagata e laititi ma le iai tele ni auga o lo’o a’afia ai (tale, e le’o malosi lelei) – e a’afia
  • Feau mamao a le tagata o lo’o a’afia (maualalo le avanoa e a’afia ai i lenei fa’ama’i)

E taua ai le fufulu mama o lima i taimi uma:

Pe a uma ona fa’aaoga le fale-le-tau, a’o le’i taumafa pe a uma foi ona taumafa.

Check your Ministry of Health website regularly for the most accurate updated information:

http://www.health.gov.ws

The risk getting/catching COVID-19 from:

  • Someone with flu-like symptoms - high
  • Someone with no symptoms - yes
  • Someone with mild symptoms (coughing, does not feel well) – yes
  • Feces of someone with the disease – low
It is, however, important to practice all prevention methods such as physical distancing of 2 metres as some persons may be infected but do not show any symptons. Always wash your hands clean with hand sanitizer regularly, and after using the toilet and before eating.
  • O tagata matutua ma tagata e i ai gasegase tumau e pei o le toto maualuga, suka, gasegase o le fatu ma tagata ua a’afia ma vaivai malosiaga fa’alenatura o le tino. E mafai ona aofia ai ma tagata ua a’afia i le fa’ama’i o le HIV/AIDS fa’apea ma e o lo’o maua i le gasegase o le Kanesa.
  • O isi tagata (80%) sa a’afia i lenei fa’ama’i ua mafai ona toe fa’afoi le malosi ma manuia e aunoa ma se togafitiga fa’apitoa.
  • Pe tusa ma le tasi (1) o le to’a ono (6) o tagata sa a’afia i lenei fa’ama’i o le Korona – 19 ua fa’ateteleina ona gasegase ma faigata ona mānava.
  • Pe tusa ma le 2% o le faitau aofai o tagata sa a’afia ua maliliu.

O tagata o lo’o maua i le fiva, tale ma faigata ona mānava e tatau ona vave vaai se foma’i.

O lo’o mata’ituina e le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina le tulaga o lenei fa’ama’i ma fa’ailoa i tagata mo le silafia.

  • Older persons and persons with pre-existing medical conditions (such as high blood pressure, heart disease, or diabetes) and with compromised immunity, such as cancer patients and Persons Living with HIV or AIDS(PLHIV), appear to develop serious illness more often than others. 
  • Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment.
  • Approximately 1 out of every 5 persons who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing.
People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.
The Ministry of Health is monitoring this situation and will update as more information becomes available as we continue to learn how COVID-2019 affects people
Fufulu mamā lima i se fasimoli ma vai mamā pe fa’aaoga foi le vailaau fufulu lima i taimi uma.
Aisea? Ole fufulu mama o lima e tape ai siama e ono pipi’i i lima.
Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and clean water.
Why? Washing your hands with soap and clean water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.

Taumamao ese ma le tagata o lo’o maua i auga e pei o tale, mafatua ma anuvale.
Aisea? O le tagata e tale ma mafatua e pipisi mai ai faua, isupe ma fatu tale mai le gutu ma le isu. Afai o oe o lo’o e nofo/tu latalata i lea tagata e mafai ona e manavaina ma i’u ai ina e a’afia aemaise pe afai o lea tagata ua iai le vairasi o le Korona-19.
Maintain at least 2 metres (6 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.
Why? When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.

Aua le tago i mata, gutu ma le isu pe afai e te le mautinoa ua fufulu mamā ou lima.

Aisea? O lima e tago i so’o se mea faitino i taimi uma. Afai ua fa’atamaia nei mea faitino ma o lo’o pipi’i ai ni siama e faigofie ona pipi’i siama i ou lima. E iai le taimi e te pa’i ai i ou mata, isu ma le gutu ma mafai ai ona o’o le siama i totonu o lou tino ma fa’asolo ai ina e ma’i.
Avoid touching your face - eyes, nose and mouth.
Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.

Ia mautinoa lou tumama i taimi uma faapea ma tagata uma o lo’o e mafuta ai (aiga, fale faigaluega). O le tumama e ala i le;
  • pupuni o le gutu ma le isu pe a tale pe mafatua i se pepa solo ma vave lafoa’i i le lapisi faitapuni.
  • Aua le fa’aaogaina le lima e pupuni ai le gutu ma le isu.
  • Aisea? O le taimi e tale pe mafatua ai e pipisi mai ai fāua, isupe ma fatu tale o lo’o iai siama/vairasi ma a’afia ai isi tagata o lo’o latalata atu, aemaise i fa’ama’i e pei o le fulū ma le Korona -19.
Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately in a closed bin.
Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.

Nofo i le fale pe afai ua e fa’alogoina e le atoa lou malosi. Afai ua maua oe i le fiva, tale, ma faigata ona manava vave vaai se fomai. Ia mulimulita’ia fautuaga mai le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina mo se fesoasoani.

Aisea?O le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina o le a fa’ailoaina vaega e tatau ona e mulimulita’ia. Afai e vave feso’ota’i le numera, o le a fesoasoani le Matagaluega e fa’ailoa se falema’i lata ane i le nofoaga o lo’o e nofo ma alala ai.

 O le a fesoasoani tele lenei faiga ina ia taofiofia ai le pipisi o lenei fa’ama’i i nisi o tagata aemaise o lou aiga ma nofoaga/ta’avale o lo’o tumutumu ai tagata lautele.

Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. Follow the directions of the Ministry of Health.
Why? The Ministry of Health will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.

Ia nofo malamalama i le tulaga o lo’o iai le fa’ama’i ole Korona-19 ma usitaia fautuaga a le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina e uiga i puipuiga o lenei fa’ama’i.

Aisea?O le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina e maua ai fa’amatalaga sa’o ma talitonuina e fa’atatau i le pipisi o lenei fa’ama’i. E mafai ona maua fa’amatalaga ma ni suiga o le tulaga o lenei fa’ama’i i le upegatafailagi o lo’o taua i lalo;   www.health.gov.ws & Public Health, Ministry of Health Samoa page
Stay informed on the latest developments about COVID-19. Follow advice given by your healthcare provider and the Ministry of Health on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Why? Ministry of Health will have the most up to date information on whether COVID-19 is spreading in your area. Get your updates at health.gov.ws

E nofo ma ola le siama/vairasi i totonu o le 1-14 aso pe a’afia ai oe, ona fa’ato’a amata lea ona iloa auga ma foliga vaaia o le fa’ama’i.
O lo’o mataituina e le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina  fa’amatalaga o le umi e a’afia ai le tagata i le siama, ona fa’atoa iloa lea o auga po’o foliga vaaia o lenei fa’ama’i ma fa’ailoa i tagata pe a iai nisi suiga.

The “incubation period” is the time between becoming infected with the virus and showing signs of flu-like symptoms.
The time between exposure to COVID-19 and the moment when symptoms start is commonly around five to six days but can range from 1 - 14
The Ministry of Health is monitoring these estimates and will update as more data become available.

O le suesuega sa fa’atino e uiga i le umi e ola ai le siama/vairasi pe a pipi’i i luga o se meafaitino e pei o laulau, nofoa, au o faitoto’a, lavalava, ma isi o lo’o fa’amauina, e mafai ona ola le siama/vairasi i totonu o 1-2 aso.
O lo’o mataituina e le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina nei fa’amatalaga ma fa’amaumauga pe a iai ni suiga e tusa ai ma fa’amatalaga maumautu mai le Fa’alapotopotoga o le SOifua Maloloina o le Lalolagi.

The most important thing to know about coronavirus on surfaces is that they can easily be cleaned with common household disinfectants that will kill the virus. Studies have shown that the COVID-19 virus can survive for up to 72 hours on plastic and stainless steel, less than 4 hours on copper and less than 24 hours on cardboard.

As, always clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, or nose.
The Ministry of Health is monitoring these estimates and will update as more data become available.

E leai se fa’amaumauga maumaututu e fa’ailoa mai ai fa’apea e mafai ona pipisi siama/vairasi o lenei fa’ama’i mai meaola ma fagafao e pei o pusi, maile ma isi.

E leai se fa’amaoniga i le taimi nei e fa’ailoa ai le pipisi o siama/vairasi o lenei fa’ama’i mai meaola.

Ae taua tele le;

  • Fa’avela lelei o taumafa e pei o aano o manufasi po’o fuamoa.
  • Teu malu meaai e pei o aano o manufasi, susu, ma totoga o meaola mo taumafataga mai iniseti ma aua ne’i fa’aleagaina e siama.
  • Aua le pa’i i meafaitino sa pipi’i tino o meaola.
  • Eli se lua e tanu lelei ai tino o meaola ua pepe ma fa’aaoga lavalava talafeagai e puipui ai le pipisi o siama.
  • Fa’ailoa i Matagaluega a le Malo po’o Fa’alapotopotoga e nafa ma le vaaia o meaola pe a iai ni manu/meaola e fa’atauina i le maketi e ono masalomia ai ni suiga po’o foliga vaaia e le masani ai.
  • Based on current evidence, human to human transmission remains the main way the virus is transmitted
  • There is a possibility for some animals to become infected through close contact with infected humans as there have been a few reported cases of animals and pets of COVID-19 patients being infected with the disease
  • It is still recommended that people who are sick with COVID-19 and people who are at risk limit contact with companion and other animals. When handling and caring for animals, basic hygiene measures should always be implemented. This includes hand washing after handling animals, their food or supplies, as well as avoiding kissing pets or being licked by them or sharing food
  • This situation is being monitored and will be updated as new evidence is provided.

It is, however, important:

  • Not to consume raw or under-cooked animal products;
  • To handle raw meat, milk or animal organs with care to avoid contamination
  • To avoid direct contact with surfaces in contact with animals.
  • Sick animals should not be slaughtered for consumption.
  • Dead animals should be safely buried or destroyed and protective clothes should be worn as a barrier to their body fluids.
  • Veterinarians should maintain a high level of vigilance and report any unusual event detected in any animal species present in the markets to veterinary authorities.
  • Tagata e faigaluega i le falema’i ma tagata tausima’i, po’o le tagata o lo’o tausima’i i totonu o le aiga mai fa’ama’i pipisi e pei o le fulu.
  • O tagata ua maua i auga o le Korona -19.
  • O tagata e le o maua i auga o fa’ama’i e a’afia ai le ala ea e pei o le Korona-19, e le tatau ona fa’aaogaina se tali fofoga (N95).
O auala e pitosili ona aoga mo le puipuiga o oe mai lenei fa’ama’i:
  • Fufulu mamā ou lima i se fasimoli ma vai mamā po’o se vailaau fufulu lima (alcohol based hand rub)
  • Pupuni lou gutu ma le isu i se pepa solo pe a tale ma mafatua ma vave lafoa’i le pepa solo sa fa’aaoga i se lapisi faitapuni.
  • Ma taumamao mai tagata o lo’o fetalei ma mafatua po’o le 1 mita le mamao.
Silasila i le ata fa’alauiloa i le fa’aaogaina o le pepa tali fofoga

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/when-and-how-to-use-masks

  • Health workers and care-takers of family members or someone at home or at a health facility with flu-like symptoms.
  • Persons who have symptoms of COVID-19.
  • People with no respiratory symptoms, such as cough, do not need to wear a medical mask.

Non-medical Masks/Cloth Masks worn in non-health settings

All preventive precautions should be practiced by members of the public who choose to wear cloth masks, this includes:
  • Cleaning hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand-rub before putting on mask;
  • Do not touch the mask while it is on;
  • Clean hands with soap and water or alcohol- based hand-rub before taking it off;
  • Replace the mask with a clean one, if it becomes damp or if you touch it inadvertently;
  • Wash the mask with detergent in hot water.
  • See section 14 and the video below for further guidance on wearing masks.
The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 :
  • to frequently wash your hands with soap and clean water;
  • cover your cough within the bend of your elbow or tissue which should be disposed of properly in a covered bin;
  • and maintain a distance of at least 2 metres (6feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing.

See video here on when to use a mask:

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/when-and-how-to-use-masks

E fa’atino e le foma’i ma le tausi soifua le mata’ituina o le tausiaina o le gasegase o le tagata ua maua i le Korona-19 i le fale aemaise lava tagata e mitimiti lava auga ma foliga vaaia o lenei fa’ama’i e le aofia ai isi a’afiaga e pei ona iai gasegase tumau e pei o le toto maualuga, suka ma gasegase o le fatu ma le HIV/AIDS ma isi.

O tagata ua a’afia e tatau ona;

  • Vave vaai se foma’i ma fa’ailoa iai le nofoaga ma le atunu’u sa e faimalaga ai.
  • Fufulu mamā lima i se fasimoli ma vai mama po’o se vailaau fufulu lima i taimi uma.
  • Aua le latalata i tagata e le’i a’afia i le mamao e 1 mita.
  • Fa’aaoga le pepa tali fofoga (N95) e pupuni ai le gutu ma le isu ma pupuni ai le pipisi atu o faua ma fatu tale i tagata e le’i a’afia.
  • Pupuni le gutu ma le isu pe a tale, mafatua, fogi le isu pe feanu i se pepa solo ma vave lafoa’i i se lapisi e ufi lelei.
  • Ia fufulu mama lima pe a uma ona tale, mafatua, pe sa pa’i i vaega o lo’o pipi’i ai ni siama i le fasimoli ma vai mama, po’o se vailaau fufulu lima i taimi uma.
  • Aua le anuvale.
  • Nofo i nofoaga/potu e iai fa’amalama ma le faitoto’a po’o fale talimalo ta’alaelae, e maua ai le savili ma gasolo lelei ai le manava.

A health care provider will make an assessment of home care for persons with flu-like symptoms and or COVID-19 with mild respiratory infection And without other health problems that compromise their immunity such as asthma, lung or heart disease, diabetes or renal failure, cancer, HIV or AIDS.

Infected persons should:

  • Seek medical care early and share their travel and medical histories with their health care provider;
  • Wash their hands with soap and clean water and use alcohol-based hand rub frequently;
  • keep distance from other individuals as much as possible (at least 2 metre);
  • Wear a medical mask as much as possible if tolerated to contain respiratory secretions from coughs, sneezes, spit etc;
  • cover mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, blowing nose, spitting with disposable paper tissue. Dispose of the material after use in a covered bin.
  • Wash hands with clean water and use alcohol based hand immediately after contact with respiratory secretions ;
  • Be in a living space with opening windows and doors, which improves flow as much as possible.

Puipuiga o aiga ma e o lo’o tausima’i i tagata ua a’afia i auga o fa’amai fulu, po o lo’o a’afia i ni fa’ama’i e a’afia ai alaea e pei o le Korona-19. (e laititi a’afiaga)

  • Ia vave vaai se foma’i o tagata o le aiga ua a’afia ma mautinoa le ta’u uma o atunu’u na faimalaga ai.
  • Ia taumamao ma ia lelei ona puipui mai vaega e maua ai siama e pei o fatutale, faua fa’apea ma feau mamao ai latou ua a’afia. Ia fa’aaoga totigi lima ma tali fofoga pe a nafa ma le fa’amamaina o vaega e pei ona taua.
  • Ia fa’aaoga tali fofoga, totigi lima faapea ma lavalava/ofu fa’apitoa tali ofu (apron) pe a fa’amamaina mea faitino na fa’aaoga e tagata o lo’o a’afia fa’apea ma le tataina o lavalava ma vaega na moe ai le tagata o lo’o a’afia.
  • Ia fufulu lima i taimi uma i le fasimoli ma vai mama po’o vailaau fufulu lima, aemaise ae le’i faia totigi lima ma tali fofoga, pe a mae’a fo’i ona fa’aaogaina.
  • Ia fa’amamago lelei lima i pepa solo mama ma vave ti’ai i totonu o lapisi e ufi lelei.
  • A leai ni pepa solo mama, ia fa’aaoga solo lima mama ma ia sui i taimi uma pe a susu.
  • Ia taumamao mai le tagata ua a’afia i le mamao e 1 mita.
  • Ia fa’aaoga se tali fofoga pe a e iai fa’atasi ma le tagata ua a’afia i se potu.
  • Aua ne’i tago i le tali fofoga i le taimi o lo’o fa’aaoga ai.
  • Ia tia’i vave le tali fofoga pe a uma ona fa’aaoga
  • Ia fufulu mama lima pe a mae’a ona tagofia ni vaega po’o mea totino na tale, mafatua, fogi ai le isu ma feanu ai lē ua a’afia.
  • Ia lelei le fegasoloa’i o le ea i totonu o so’o se vaega o fale nofo.
  • Ia fa’ailoga vaega e moe ma fa’aaoga e le tagata o lo’o a’afia e pei o ieafu, taga aluga, aluga, fala, fa’amalu fa’apea ma ipu o lo’o tausami. Ia mautinoa e fufulu mama i vailaau fufulu ipu ma vai mama ona toe fa’aaoga lea.
  • Ia fa’amama i aso uma vaega e soli ma fa’aaoga so’o i totonu o le potu po’o se vaega o le fale o lo’o tausia ai le tagata ua a’afia e pei o laulau o lo’o fa’aaoga, o le moega fa’apea ma so’o se meafale o lo’o iai.
  • Ia fa’aaoga i aso uma fasimoli ma vailaau e fufulu ai vaega o lo’o fa’aaoga e le tagata o lo’o a’afia. A mae’a ona fufulu ma fa’amama ona toe fa’aaoga lea o vailaau e tape ai siama (fua o le vailaau e 0.5% sodium hypoclorite).
  • Ia fufulu ma fa’amama i aso uma le fale taele ma le fale-le-taua. Ia fa’aaoga vailaau e tape ai siama e pei ona ta’ua i luga.
  • Ia fa’amama lavalava o le tagata ua a’afia, ieafu ma ie moega i se fasimoli pe a ta lima, pe fa’amama i le masini tamea i lona vevela fa’atulagaina (60-90) ina ia mautinoa ua pepe siama e ono pipi’i ai. Ia tu’u lelei ie moega ua fa’aaogaina i totonu o se ato tagamea ma ia mautinoa ina ia aua ne’i pa’i iai.
  • Ia mautinoa ina ia aua ne’i feso’ota’i/pa’i i so’o se vaega e ono a’afia i le siama i le si’osi’omaga o lo’o tausia ai le tagata ua a’afia e pei o;(pulumu fufulu nifo, o le ulaula fa’atasi i le sikaleti e tasi, aai ma feinu i le ipu e tasi, faaaoga le solo e tasi ma momoe ma fa’aaoga ieafu ma iemoega e tasi.

Relatives or caregivers to individuals with flu-like symptoms and with mild respiratory symptoms should:

  • Seek medical care early for persons in their care and share their travel medical histories;
  • Avoid direct contact with body fluids, particularly oral or respiratory secretions, and stool. Use disposable gloves and a mask when providing oral or respiratory care and when handling stool, urine and other waste.
  • Use mask, gloves and protective clothing (eg. Plastic apron) when cleaning surfaces or handling clothing or linen soiled with body fluids;
  • Wash hands frequently with soap and clean water and use alcohol-based hand rub hygiene, especially before and after removing gloves and the mask;
  • Dry hands preferably with paper-towels and dispose in a covered bin;
  • If paper towels are not available use clean cloth towels and replace them when they become wet.
  • Keep distance from affected individual as much as possible (at least 2 metres);
  • Wear a medical mask* when in the same room with the affected individual;
  • Do not touch your mask once it is on;
  • Dispose of the mask immediately after use.
  • Clean hands immediately after contact with respiratory secretions from coughs, sneezes, blowing nose, spitting;
  • Improve the airflow in living space by opening windows as much as possible.
  • Use dedicated linen and eating utensils for the patient; these items should be cleaned with soap and water after use and may be re-used.
  • Clean and disinfect daily surfaces that are frequently touched in the room where the patient is being cared for, such as bedside tables, bedframes and other bedroom furniture.
  • Regular household soap or detergent should be used first for cleaning, and then, after rinsing, regular household disinfectant containing 0.5% sodium hypochlorite (i.e., equivalent to 5000 pm or 1 part bleach to 9 parts water) should be applied.  
  • Clean and disinfect bathroom and toilet surfaces at least once daily. Regular household soap or detergent should be used first for cleaning, and then, after rinsing, regular household disinfectant containing 0.5% sodium hypochlorite should be applied.
  • Clean the patient’s clothes, bed linen, and bath and hand towels using regular laundry soap and water or machine wash at 60–90 °C with common household detergent, or boil and dry thoroughly. Place contaminated linen into a laundry bag. Do not shake soiled laundry and avoid contaminated materials coming into contact with skin and clothes.
  • Avoid other types of exposure to contaminated items from the patient’s immediate environment (e.g., do not share toothbrushes, cigarettes, eating and drinking utensils, dishes, drinks, towels, washcloths or bed linen).

Transport to a Health care facility

  • If you are ill, call for an ambulance, and avoid taking public transportation if possible;
  • If you use a private vehicle, ensure that all the windows are open/down to allow air flow and wear a mask;
  • The vehicle should be cleaned and disinfected after transporting an ill person.

Contact the Ministry of Health COVID-19 Health Emergency Operation Call Centre: 800-6440

Mo nis fa’amatalaga ia fa’afeso’otai le Matagaluega o le Soifua Maloloina i le telefoni: 800-6440

O tali fofoga o nisi o vaega o puipuiga e tatau ona fa’aaoga ma o fa’atasi ma nisi o puipuiga e pei o;

  • Fufulu mama o lima i aso uma i fasimoli ma vai mama po’o vailaau fufulu lima;
  • Pupuni lou fofoga pe a e tale pe mafatua i se solo pepa mama ma lafoa’i vave i se lapisi e ufi lelei;
  • Ia taumamao mai le tagata ua a’afia i le mamao e 1 mita aemaise pe a mafatua pe tale fo’i.

O tali fofoga, e fautuaina na’o tagata o lo’o faigaluega i le falema’i, o tagata tausi ma’i, fa’apea ma tagata o lo’o a’afia pe gasegase i auga e pei o le fiva ma le tale.

  • Ae le’i faia le tali fofoga, e tatau ona fufulu mama muamua lima i se fasimoli ma vai mama po’o se vailaau fufulu lima.
  • Ia mautinoa e le’o iai se vaega e masae po’o fa’alegaina o le tali fofoga ae le’i fa’aaogaina.
  • Ia iloilo lelei vaega o le talifofoga e pito i luga (vaega o lo’o malo – iai le u’amea laititi i totonu).
  • Ia pito i fafo le vaega lanu o le tali fofoga.
  • Ia fa’amoulu ma ia mautinoa ia u’u lelei le vaega o lo’o malo ma oomi ina ia nofo lelei i le isu.
  • Ia toso le pito i lalo ma ia mautinoa ua ufi lelei lou gutu fa’atasi ma lou auvae ina ia aua ne’i iai se vaega e ava e ono sa’o atu ai se siama.
  • Afai ua uma ona fa’amoulu lou tali fofoga, e le tatau ona toe tago iai e aveese sei vagana ua mae’a ona fa’aaogaina ona aveese lea ma lafoa’i i se lapisi.
  • A ua uma ona fa’aaoga, ia aveese loa le tali fofoga; aveese muamua le pa’u meme’i o lo’o fa’amau ai i tua o taliga ona toso lea o le pa’u meme’i, e tele ai le avanoa e aua ai ne’i pipi’i i foliga fa’apea ma lavalava ina ne’i pa’i le vaega pito i fafo sa fa’atamaia i ni siama.
  • Ia vave lafoa’i le tali fofoga i se lapisi e ufi lelei pe a uma ona fa’aaoga. E le toe mafai ona fa’aaogaina.
  • Ia fufulu mama lima i se fasimoli ma vai mama po’o se vailaau fufulu lima pe a uma ona lafoa’i i le lapisi le tali fofoga. E fautuaina le fa’aaoga o le vailaau fufulu lima. Ae afai e iloa ni palapala i lima, e mana’omia ona fa’aaoga se fasimoli ma vai mama.

Silasila i le ata o lo’o taua i lalo i le fa’aaogaina ma le fa’amouluina o le tali fofoga, fa’apea ma le toe aveeseina pe a uma ona fa’aaoga:

O tali fofoga o nisi o vaega o puipuiga e tatau ona fa’aaoga ma o fa’atasi ma nisi o puipuiga e pei o;

  • Fufulu mama o lima i aso uma i fasimoli ma vai mama po’o vailaau fufulu lima;
  • Pupuni lou fofoga pe a e tale pe mafatua i se solo pepa mama ma lafoa’i vave i se lapisi e ufi lelei;
  • Ia taumamao mai le tagata ua a’afia i le mamao e 1 mita aemaise pe a mafatua pe tale fo’i.

Masks should be used alongside other preventative and protective measures such as:

  • Frequently washing your hands with soap and clean water and using an alcohol based hand rub;
  • covering your cough within the bend of your elbow or tissue which should be disposed of properly in a covered bin;
  • and maintaining a distance of at least 2 metres (6 feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing.

Remember, a mask should only be used by health workers, care takers, and individuals with respiratory symptoms, such as fever and cough.

  • Before touching the mask, clean hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or soap and clean water.
  • Inspect the mask for tears or holes and do not use if there are any.
  • Orient which side is the top side (where the metal strip is).
  • Ensure the proper side of the mask faces outwards (the coloured side).
  • Place the mask to your face. Pinch the metal strip or stiff edge of the mask so it moulds to the shape of your nose.
  • Pull down the bottom of the mask so it covers your mouth and your chin.
  • Once your mask is on do not touch it until you are ready to remove it and dispose of it permanently.
  • After use, take off the mask; remove the elastic loops from behind the ears while keeping the mask away from your face and clothes, to avoid touching potentially contaminated surfaces of the mask.
  • Discard the mask in a closed bin immediately after use. Do not reuse Masks.
  • Perform hand hygiene after touching or discarding the mask – Use alcohol-based hand rub or, if visibly soiled, wash your hands with soap and clean water.

See video here on when to use a mask:

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/when-and-how-to-use-masks

Avoid travel locally or overseas:

  • if you have a cough, fever, or have difficulty breathing;
  • seek medical attention early and share your travel history with your health care provider.

While travelling locally or overseas:

  • avoid close contact with persons with flu-like symptoms;
  • frequently clean your hands by washing with soap and water or use alcohol-based hand rub; and avoid touching your face – eyes, nose and mouth;
  • avoid spitting in public and cover you cough and sneeze with a bent/flexed elbow or tissue, which should be discarded and wash your hands immediately afterwards;
  • eat only well-cooked food; and
  • avoid close contact with animals that are sick.

If you choose to wear a medical Mask/N95 or other non-medical masks please read Section 14 carefully which describes the proper use of the medical mask:

If you become ill while on an aircraft, boat, or in public transportation:

  • inform the crew or driver assist you to seek medical attention; and
  • share your travel history with your health care provider.

Owners, drivers and caretakers of vehicles including those used for public transportation should:

  • Practice and support good hand and respiratory hygiene as described in section 8 - What can I do to protect myself and prevent spreading COVID-19?
  • Clean and disinfect vehicles daily including all contact surfaces such as door handles.
  • Encourage passengers to practice good hand and respiratory hygiene through signage within the vehicle and via conversation with passengers.

Check the Travel Advisory for updated information

www.samoagovt.ws/2020/02/special-health-travel-advisory-in-relation-to-the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19/

Schools should continue to implement and ensure good hand and respiratory hygiene as described in

See section 8 - What can I do to protect myself and prevent spreading COVID-19?

  • Members of staff and children should stay at home, and not attend school if they have a cough, fever, or have difficulty breathing and should seek medical attention.
  • Parents or care-givers should seek medical attention early for children and share their travel and health histories with their health care provider.

At school:

  • avoid close contact with persons with flu-like symptoms;
  • frequently clean your hands by washing with soap and water or use alcohol-based hand rub; and avoid touching your face – eyes, nose and mouth;
  • avoid spitting and cover your cough and sneeze with a bent/flexed elbow or tissue, which should be discarded in a closed bin and wash your hands immediately afterwards;
  • Contaminated surfaces such door handles, desks, chairs, toilets, sinks should be cleaned and disinfected in addition to normal school sanitization practices. 
  • Avoid sharing drinks, eating and drinking utensils with affected persons.

Compulsory screenings of all arriving passengers to Samoa are now in effect at all ports of entry.

 The travelling public is advised that should they become ill on a boat or aircraft to inform the crew to seek medical attention and share your travel history.

 Travels Advisory and Restrictions:

Due to New Zealand’s close proximity to Samoa and the confirmation of its COVID-19 case in Auckland New Zealand, the increased risk of COVID – 19 entering Samoa has elevated from High to Very High as its impact on Samoa’s population would be catastrophic.
Travelers should regularly check the following Travel Advisory link on the requirement for travel to Samoa:

www.samoagovt.ws/2020/02/special-health-travel-advisory-in-relation-to-the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19/

All Travelers Entering Samoa are advised to take note of the following requirements:

  1. A special Health Declaration Form is required to be filled in by all travelling passengers’ in flight or arrival to Samoa.
  2. All Travelers entering Samoa FROM or TRANSITING through all ports (New Zealand, Australia, Fiji, Am. Samoa, Hawaii and Tonga) are REQUIRED to undergo medical examination by a Registered Medical Practitioner within (3) days before ARRIVAL. This medical clearance report is required for check-in prior to issuing of boarding passes.
  3. All travellers originating FROM or who have TRANSITED through Mainland China, must spend at least 14 days of self-quarantine at country of last port that is free of COVID-19 and must undergo medical clearance at least (3) days as required for all other travellers.
  4. If in the event you arrive within the 14- day period, health quarantine measures will be applied. Return to the country of travel origin will be considered if traveller is a non-resident.
  5. All sea port entry will be screened at the quarantine buoy before ship dock at wharf.

All Travelers OUT of Samoa:

  1. It is strongly recommended that all persons intending to travel to China and any country affected by the COVID-19 are strongly recommended to postpone their travel arrangements unless necessary.
  2. Preventive measures should be adhered to at all times in the event that travel cannot be postponed. Please note that the above will be applied upon return to Samoa
  3. Be aware of the signs and symptoms and avoid sick people.
  4. Currently, most of the ports of entry in other countries now have travel restrictions
For more information contact Tagaloa Dr. Robert Thomsen on Phone: (685) 66503/7676015 or          Email: robertt@health.gov.ws

Health care workers will ensure that individuals with respiratory symptoms will:

  • Wear a medical mask while waiting in triage or waiting areas or during transportation within the facility;
  • Wear a medical mask when staying in cohorting areas dedicated to suspected or confirmed cases;
To further protect you, the Ministry of Health is Implementing border control measures at all ports of entry. See link here: www.samoagovt.ws/2020/02/special-health-travel-advisory-in-relation-to-the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19/

At health facilities, the Ministry is prepared and is in a state of readiness to respond to COVID-19, including:

  • Implementing Infection, Prevention and Control Strategies to prevent and control the spread of COVID 19 such as ensuring triage, early recognition, and source control i.e. isolating patients with suspected COVID-19;
  • Applying standard precautions for all patients and ensure that they follow hand and respiratory hygiene: ensuring that all patients 1.) cover their nose and mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing; 2.) are offered a medical mask to patients with suspected COVID-19 infection while they are in waiting/public areas or in cohorting rooms; 3.) perform hand hygiene after contact with respiratory secretions.
  • Applying the WHO’s ‘My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene’ approach – i.e. all health care providers are cleaning their hands: 1) before touching a patient; 2) before any clean or aseptic procedure is performed; 3) after exposure to body fluid; 4) after touching a patient, and 5.)after touching a patient’s surroundings
  • Implementing additional contact and droplet precautions including limiting the movement of patients and ensuring that they wear masks when they are outside of their rooms.
  • Implementing administrative controls such as ensuring that healthcare workers are trained to manage COVID-19 and monitoring compliance
  • Using environmental and engineering controls such ensuring that disinfecting and cleaning procedures are followed and where necessary corrected.
Individuals with respiratory symptoms should:
  • Adopt proper mask management and seek medical care if experiencing fever, cough and difficulty breathing, as soon as possible;
  • Avoid gatherings and frequenting and closed crowded spaces;
  • Maintain distance of at least 2-metres from other persons and if coughing or sneezing cover nose and mouth with flexed elbow or paper tissue, dispose of tissue immediately in a covered bin and after use and perform hand hygiene by washing hands with soap and clean and use an alcohol-based hand rub.

 Individuals without respiratory symptoms should:

  • Avoid gatherings and frequenting and closed crowded spaces;
  • Maintain distance of at least 2 metres from any individual with COVID-19 respiratory symptoms (e.g., coughing, sneezing); - perform hand hygiene frequently, using alcohol-based hand rub if hands are not visibly soiled or soap and water when hands are visibly soiled;
  • If coughing or sneezing cover nose and mouth with flexed elbow or paper tissue, dispose of tissue immediately after use and perform hand hygiene;
  • Refrain from touching face – eyes, mouth and nose;
  • If masks are used, best practices should be followed on how to wear, remove, and dispose of them and on hand hygiene action after removal (see Section 17 on the use of/wearing medical mask).

Workplaces are key partners and collaborators that can help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Call the Ministry of Health

Workplaces and businesses should:

  • create an enabling environment that support good hand and respiratory hygiene by staff and clients as described in section 8 - What can I do to protect myself and prevent spreading COVID-19?
  • ensure that sick members of staff are encouraged and advised to seek the necessary medical attention they need and stay at home at the earliest sign of illness.
  • Ensure that hand rub/sanitizer is available at the entry to the premises for both the staff and the public’s use with signage that encourages use
  • If staff are attending to the public ensure that hand-rub is easily available at key points of contact such as desks, serving counters, cashiers’ area. These surfaces should be cleaned regularly and thoroughly, including phones, computers and keyboards.
  • The workplace/business premises should be cleaned and disinfected daily including all contact surfaces such as door handles, toilets, sinks etc.

Important for Veterinarians and Slaughterhouse workers:

  • Slaughterhouse workers, veterinarians in charge of animal and food inspection in markets, market workers, and those handling live animals and animal products should practice good personal hygiene, including frequent hand washing after touching animals and animal products.
  • They should consider wearing protective gowns, gloves, masks while professionally handling animals and fresh animal products.
  • Equipment and working stations should be disinfected frequently, at least once a day.
  • Protective clothing should be removed after work and washed daily.
  • Workers should avoid exposing family members to soiled work clothing, shoes, or other items that may have come into contact with potentially contaminated material.
  • It is therefore recommended that protective clothes and items remain at the workplace for daily washing.
Yes. The likelihood of an infected person contaminating commercial goods is low and the risk of catching the virus that causes COVID-19 from a package that has been moved, travelled, and exposed to different conditions and temperature is also low. 

Quarantine means restricting activities or separating people who are not ill themselves but may have been exposed to COVID-19. The goal is to prevent spread of the disease at the time when people just develop symptoms..

Quarantine is different from isolation.

Isolation means separating people who are ill with symptoms of COVID-19 and may be infectious to prevent the spread of the disease.(See section 22. below)

Physical distancing means being physically apart.

Self-isolation is an important measure taken by those who have COVID-19 symptoms to avoid infecting others in the community, including family members.

Self-isolation is when a person who is experiencing fever, cough or other COVID-19 symptoms stays at home and does not go to work, school or public places. This can be voluntarily or based on his/her health care provider’s recommendation.

Seek medical help.
When you attend the health facility wear a mask if possible, keep at least 2 metres ( distant from other people and do not touch surfaces with your hands. If it is a child who is sick help the child to follow and stick to this advice.
If a person is in self-isolation, it is because he/she is ill but not severely ill (requiring medical attention)

  • Stay in a well-ventilated room, or a separate section of the fale, and ensure that there is access to water for hand-washing and toilet facilities
  • If this is not possible, place beds at least 1 metre apart
  • Keep at least 1 metre from others, even from your family members
  • Monitor your symptoms daily
  • Isolate for 14 days, even if you feel healthy
  • If you develop difficulty breathing, contact your healthcare provider immediately – call them first if possible
  • Stay positive and energized by keeping in touch with loved ones by phone or online, and by exercising yourself at home.
A) A patient with acute respiratory illness (ARI) described as fever and at least one sign/symptom of respiratory disease (i.e. cough, shortness of breath) with no cause that fully explains the clinical presentation AND a history of travel to or residence in a country/area or territory reporting local transmission of COVID19 disease during the 14 days prior to symptom onset. Or

B) A patient with any acute respiratory illness AND having been in contact with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19 in the 14 days prior to symptom onset; or

C) A patient with severe acute respiratory infection (fever and at least one sign/symptom of respiratory disease (e.g., cough, shortness breath) AND requiring hospitalization AND with no other aetiology that fully explains the clinical presentation.

A suspected case should be provided a surgical mask and have sample(s) collected for COVID-19 laboratory testing

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